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Revisiting the “Christmas Holiday Effect” in the Southern Hemisphere

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of the American Heart Association Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, December 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#11 of 3,462)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
99 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
84 tweeters
facebook
6 Facebook pages
googleplus
3 Google+ users
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
7 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
18 Mendeley
Title
Revisiting the “Christmas Holiday Effect” in the Southern Hemisphere
Published in
Journal of the American Heart Association Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, December 2016
DOI 10.1161/jaha.116.005098
Pubmed ID
Authors

Josh Knight, Chris Schilling, Adrian Barnett, Rod Jackson, Phillip Clarke

Abstract

A "Christmas holiday effect" showing elevated cardiovascular mortality over the Christmas holidays (December 25 to January 7) was demonstrated previously in study from the United States. To separate the effect of seasonality from any holiday effect, a matching analysis was conducted for New Zealand, where the Christmas holiday period falls within the summer season. New Zealand mortality data for a 25-year period (1988-2013) was analyzed based on the same methodology used in the previous study. Locally weighted smoothing was used to calculate an "expected" number of deaths for each day of the year. The expected value was compared with the actual number of deaths. In addition, mean age at death was estimated and used to assess the life-years lost due to excess mortality. There were 738 409 deaths (197 109 coded as cardiac deaths) during the period. We found evidence of a Christmas holiday effect in our of medical facility's cardiac deaths, with an excess event rate of 4.2% (95% CI 0.7-7.7%) leading to ≈4 additional deaths per annum. The average age of those with fatal cardiac deaths was 76.8 years (SD 13.5) during the Christmas holiday period, resulting in 148 to 222 years of life lost per annum. Cardiac mortality is elevated during the Christmas holiday period relative to surrounding time periods. Our findings are consistent with a previously reported study conducted in the United States, suggesting that cardiac mortality does not take a "summer break."

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 84 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 18 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Kenya 1 6%
Unknown 17 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 39%
Student > Bachelor 3 17%
Unspecified 2 11%
Other 2 11%
Student > Postgraduate 1 6%
Other 3 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 8 44%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 11%
Unspecified 2 11%
Computer Science 1 6%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 6%
Other 4 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 857. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 December 2018.
All research outputs
#5,575
of 13,561,307 outputs
Outputs from Journal of the American Heart Association Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease
#11
of 3,462 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#344
of 373,036 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of the American Heart Association Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease
#1
of 130 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,561,307 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,462 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 22.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 373,036 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 130 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.